Movies Reviews: Men and the Uncontrollable forces burning inside

Movies Reviews: Men and the Uncontrollable forces burning inside
16 novembro 09:46 2017 Imprimir

By Roger Costa

PORTO

Love is an unknown, uncontrollable force that burns inside, leading to impulse, risks and vulnerability. In some cases, it could be destructive, deceitful or simply pure and ingenious. A young writer and a slightly older woman meet at a cafe in the bohemian Portuguese city of the title. The profound conversation that initiates a seemingly impossible love affair appears three times, structured as explanatory takes of each one of the lovers, and later the consequences of their connection. Through their interactions with other players, family members, and locals, the narrative examines different stages of love, as they seek wisdom and understanding on how to manage the intense desire. Brazilian-born Writer-director Gabe Klinger’s feature debut is a brilliantly crafted love story that naturally embraces the melancholic, nostalgic and compulsive sense of irresistible love, transmitted through the grey, foggy, moist cinematography, the elegant, breathtaking piano and blues soundtrack, and the self examination of unbalanced emotions. In his final role, Anton Yelchin (who died at age 27 in the Summer of 2016), gives a courageous performance as Jake, a passionate portrait of a young man taken by his heart, and convinced of his philosophies. The gorgeous Lucie Lucas, who plays the ambiguous and adulterous Mati, also sets fire on screen with her hypnotizing sensuality. Larry Gross, who penned many Hollywood action blockbusters, co-wrote the script, while Jim Jarmusch is an executive producer in this captivating and sexually intense mystery. (A Kino Lorber Release. Opens Friday, November 17th at Landmark Sunshine Cinemas NYC.)

HOLY AIR

Winner of the FIPRESCI Prize at Jerusalem Film Festival, and an acclaimed selection at this year’s Tribeca, Shady Srour’s sophomore film is an irreverent satire seen through the experiences of a male crisis. Adam is dealing with many conflicts at once. After many frustrating attempts, his wife finally gets pregnant, at the same time his father is going through a severe medical issue. To reassure himself as a man, and as a competent professional, he joins the religious business, entering the competition selling bottled-air from the holy land to devotees. Hilariously intelligent and accurate, writer-director Srour conceives a precious analysis on many contemporary social issues, such as women’s rights, financial insecurity, the business of spirituality, and the effects of a middle-age crisis. The cynical dialogue is another attribute, while the ensemble cast exceeds with debaucherous chemistry. And despite the profane context, the film reveals itself as a beautiful meditation on the gap between man and Creator. (A Samuel Goldwyn Films Release. Opens Friday, November 17th at Village East Cinemas NYC.)

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